Sunday, June 24, 2012

How Many Does it Take to Tango?

6 comments:

nicrap said...

IS it a trick question? ;)

-FJ said...

I contend that it takes "3" to tango, else there would be no dance.

-FJ said...

The dance advertises a strong "pair bond" and is intended to discourage 3rd parties from "cutting in". W/O third parties, the dance would not need to be as synchronically intricate.

-FJ said...

Flamenco, on the other hand is more "martially" oriented and "dares" third parties to "try" and compete. ;)

-FJ said...

from the Jowett introuction to Plato's "The Laws"

The institutions of Sparta and Crete are admitted by the Lacedaemonian and Cretan to have one aim only: they were intended by the legislator to inspire courage in war. To this the Athenian objects that the true lawgiver should frame his laws with a view to all the virtues and not to one only. Better is he who has temperance as well as courage, than he who has courage only; better is he who is faithful in civil broils, than he who is a good soldier only. Better, too, is peace than war; the reconciliation than the defeat of an enemy. And he who would attain all virtue should be trained amid pleasures as well as pains. Hence there should be convivial intercourse among the citizens, and a man's temperance should be tested in his cups, as we test his courage amid dangers. He should have a fear of the right sort, as well as a courage of the right sort.

At the beginning of the second book the subject of pleasure leads to education, which in the early years of life is wholly a discipline imparted by the means of pleasure and pain. The discipline of pleasure is implanted chiefly by the practice of the song and the dance. Of these the forms should be fixed, and not allowed to depend on the fickle breath of the multitude.

nicrap said...

Interesting. :)